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    Event To Watch: "Archaeology of Beers" At China Institute (New York)

    Keep an eye on Jing Daily this Friday for our exclusive coverage of the first session of the China Institute's "Archaeology of Beers: Tastings of Ancient Ales" lecture series, featuring Sam Calagione of Dogfish Head Brewery.
    Jing DailyAuthor
      Published   in Fashion

    Two-Part Lecture Series Will Feature Experts Like Sam Calagione, Dr. Agnes Hsu, And Dr. Patrick McGovern#

    Keep an eye on Jing Daily this Friday for our exclusive coverage of the first session of the China Institute's "Archaeology of Beers: Tastings of Ancient Ales" lecture series. We'll be attending the first session on October 7, where host Sam Calagione, the founder and president of Dogfish Head Brewery -- one of America's fastest-growing and most well-respected craft breweries -- will introduce some of the ancient beers his company has re-created with the help of Dr. Patrick McGovern, a leading molecular archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1999, Calagione and McGovern have worked together to bring some of the world's earliest beer specimens, found in places as far-flung as Honduras, China and Turkey, back to life.

    At tomorrow's event, among other beers developed by Dogfish Head and Dr. McGovern, Sam Calagione will discuss the process of developing Chateau Jiahu, first released in 2006. Based on an ingredient list unearthed by archaeologists at a 9,000-year-old Chinese tomb -- a recipe that even predates the earliest evidence of grape-based wines -- Chateau Jiahu combines rice flakes, wildflower honey, Muscat grapes, barley malt, hawthorn fruit, and Chrysanthemum flowers in a unique blend unlike any other beer available on the American, or any other, market.

    Calagione will also discuss other beers created for Dogfish Head's Ancient Ale series, including Midas Touch, based on molecular evidence found in a tomb in Turkey, and Theobroma, the result of chemical analysis of pottery shards discovered in Honduras.

    With the growing interest among Chinese breweries in developing higher-quality "premium" products to compliment their existing low-end, low-profit lines, it'll be interesting to hear the story of how Chateau Jiahu came back to life, a story that combines China's formerly extinct brewing traditions with the experimental attitude of America's craft breweries.

    "Archaeology of Beers: Tastings of Ancient Ales" at the China Institute
    #

    125 E 65th St, New York, NY 10065-7088 (map)
    (212) 744-8181

    First tasting on Thursday, October 7 (6:30 – 8:30 PM)
    Second tasting on Friday, December 17 (6 – 8 PM)
    $45 member / $55 non-member (both events)
    $25 member / $30 non-member (per event)

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